Ron Miller is a Maryland personal injury lawyer who focuses on serious injury and wrongful death cases involving motor vehicle collisions, medical malpractice, and products and premises liability. This site is designed to provide practical information to both injury victims and plaintiffs' attorneys in the Baltimore-Washington area who want to achieve a fair settlement or verdict. If you are looking for counsel for your case, call him at 410-553-6000

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“There’s two sides to every story. I saw the video. That’s their personal business, and it shouldn’t have affected his career. I don’t agree with domestic violence, but she’s still with him, so obviously it wasn’t that big of a deal. Everyone should just drop it.”

- Random Ravens Fan Last Night

“The case is a perfect symbol of all that’s wrong with the litigation system in this country.”

Lisa Rickard,  President of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for Legal Reform and the American Tort Reform Association talking about the infamous lawsuit where an administrative law judge sued for $65 million claiming a dry cleaner had lost his pants

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scheduleScheduling depositions in car accident lawsuits usually is not a complex thing. You call the other side, you agree on dates, and you have your depositions. The key is cooperation. Rather than unilaterally serving a deposition notice, you just call opposing counsel and agree to the place, date, and time. There are rarely issues.

For some reason, and I’m not entirely sure why, scheduling depositions in medical malpractice cases always seems to be an ordeal. Common courtesies that I’m sure many Maryland malpractice lawyers accord each other in the rest of our lives sometimes go out the window. Sometimes, it seems like otherwise ethical lawyers have no qualms about making up excuses for why they or the deponents cannot attend a deposition that are not based in fact. Often, you can figure this out when you depose the witness. Continue reading →

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pitbull2There are lots of insurance defense lawyers in Maryland that you just cannot figure out why someone would hire them to defend a personal injury case.  They unnecessarily complicate cases, bill hours on things that are completely unrelated to anything that would actually benefit the defense and, often, juries cannot stand them because there is a positive correlation between someone willing to be this annoying and how annoying they actually are, according to independent studies that I have conducted.

Why Insurance Companies Hire These Lawyers

The lawyer that fits this profile sometimes gets a lot of work.  Why?  Like any job, insurance adjusters are all kinds of different people.  Democrats and Republicans.  Athletes and bookworms.  Compassionate and mean.  Attractive and not-so-much.  But, disproportionately,  they are tough guys.  They want to wage war in the seas and the valley and talk tough and be tough.  For some of them, the rest of their lives belie this mentality.  But that is a whole different story. Continue reading →

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adultery8But she caught me on the counter (It wasn’t me)
Saw me banging on the sofa (It wasn’t me)
I even had her in the shower (It wasn’t me)
She even caught me on camera (It wasn’t me)
She saw the marks on my shoulder (It wasn’t me)
Heard the words that I told her (It wasn’t me)
Heard the scream get louder (It wasn’t me) – Shaggy (2000)

U.S. District Court Judge Paul Grimm granted summary judgment for Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority last week in a slip and fall, no impact bus accident case in Hall v. WMATA. A slip and fall no collision”the door shut on me”  bus accident case in federal court?  I know it sounds bad, sure. But it gets worse. Continue reading →

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Medical malpractice kills 400,000 people a year in this country and injures 4 million more.  The media is now starting to focus on this story, as we just talked about on Monday after the Baltimore Sun’s story on negligence in Maryland hospital.  Stories like this do help plaintiffs in medical malpractice cases.  Why?  Because many of us still view doctors as infallible and that wall of invincibility is being to fall.

So, then, why is it so hard to find a medical malpractice lawyer in Maryland who will take your case?

Joanna Shepherd, a law professor at Emory University, conducted a national survey of medical malpractice attorneys that explored, among other things, why malpractice attorneys reject cases.   

Reason for Rejection Case Percent of Respondents
Unclear causation 19.25%
Unclear evidence of malpractice 29.11%
Case is unlikely to settle 0.94%
Insufficient damages expected from trial or settlement 38.73%
Complexity and expense of bringing the claim 11.74
Hospital not involved in medical malpractice 0.23%

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complaintThere are a variety of motivations that impact the victim’s decision to settle or go to trial. It is worth underscoring: it is the victim’s decision. It is not a decision for the attorneys or the family. The victim has to choose the path that is best for them.  There are certainly some Maryland injury attorneys who do not see it that way.  It really is tempting — I’ve felt it — to think you know what is best for your client.  I’ve settled cases where I was convinced the offer would double in a matter of weeks.  But as a lawyer, your job really is to give your client the information to make an informed choice.

Here are the three key factors victims need to consider: risk, time, and emotional strain.

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malpractice 4The Baltimore Sun published an important front page article yesterday on hospital errors in Maryland.

The premise of the article is a stunningly simple yet different approach to medical mistakes in Maryland hospitals.  It goes like this.  We have an estimated 400,000 who are killed every year by medical malpractice.  How are Maryland hospitals faring?  We don’t know.  There is a major epidemic that kills enough people in this county to fill Camden Yards 10 times a year.  Malpractice that causes serious injury could fill Camden Yards over 100 times (4,000,000) a year.  Yet we have no quality way of estimating how Maryland is faring.  Why is this? The hospitals, doctors, and insurance companies make no effort to provide this data to us.

Said differently, we are all — particularly those of us that are young or old — vulnerable to this grave risk.  We face other risks of course.  Heart disease, cancer, motor vehicle accidents, diabetes, all pose great risks of death.  With these risks, we have the ability to sift through the data, understand the risks, and do what we can.  We quit smoking, eat better, wear seat belts, and so forth.

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efilingWe have been hearing for some time about the Maryland Electronic Courts (MDEC) project that will eventually allow for electronic filings, allowing Maryland lawyers to get the same modern conveniences of electronic filing that we have enjoyed in federal court for quite some time. This type of integrated case management system — between circuit, district, and appellate courts – will really change the practice of law on an administrative level and will hopefully allow us to speed past some of the filing related bottlenecks we have in pushing cases forward.

No more paralegals and couriers jumping  into their cars and racing to the courthouse to meet filing deadlines.  We don’t do a ton of the “last minute rush” stuff here but it does happen occasionally.  I have the courier bills to prove it which always annoy me to no end. Anne Arundel County somehow got picked to kickoff the e-filing program. Starting Monday, September 15,2014, lawyers can register for e-filing to get ready for the MDEC’s launch in Anne Arundel County. When this does launch, and it won’t be fully operational for year, it is not going to be optional for lawyers.

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malpractice5One of the great selling points of caps in medical malpractice cases is that it encourages doctors to come to your state to practice.  Every state, particularly in jurisdictions with rural areas where access and availability to doctors is a prominent concern, want to attract a healthy supply of doctors to their state.  The thinking it is that doctors will flee to states where the litigation climate is more favorable to doctors.   A new study suggests this oft cited canard support tort reform is 100% true.  But not in a good way for patients.

A Notre Dame economist published a study titled “Medical Malpractice Reform, the Supply of Physicians, and Adverse Selection,” Journal of Law and Economics” that found that “when a county’s neighboring state passes a cap on noneconomic damages, the supply of physicians falls by 4 percent” in that county.”   Tort reform advocates are nodding their heads vigorously.

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